The Ford House

Edsel & Eleanor Ford House tells the story of the home life of a prominent American family.

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New Ford House Exhibit Gets Back to Nature
Posted: April 10, 2011

New Ford House Exhibit Gets Back to Nature
Art for Nature’s Sake Exhibit Commemorates Federal Duck Stamp Program
 
A new exhibit celebrating the Ford Family’s passion for nature and wildlife conservation “glides” into Edsel & Eleanor Ford House (Ford House) this May. Art for Nature’s Sake: Duck Stamps and Wetland Conservation will be on display at Ford House May 7 through July 4.
 
The exhibit explores the important benefits and diversity of our nation’s wetlands, and features 36 signed waterfowl prints and stamps, commemorating our country’s most successful conservation program – the Federal Duck Stamp Program. Since 1934, the sale of duck stamps has generated millions of dollars to procure and conserve wetlands, including the surrounding animals and plants. 
 
Admittance to Art for Nature’s Sake is included in regular admission and is free to Members.
 
“Henry and Edsel Ford were both passionate nature lovers and deeply committed to wildlife conservation,” said Ford House Director of Interpretation and Programs Chris Shires. “This new exhibit, as well as the variety of nature-focused programming at Ford House highlights this interest and carries on the important legacy left by the Ford family.”
 
Ford House visitors can also experience first-hand the wide array of bird life that inhabit the property by walking the grounds as  the Fords did – searching for migratory birds on the estate’s Bird Island peninsula or hoping to spy red-winged black birds or a Cooper’s Hawk  in the trees. Morning and evening Bird Walks, led by Rosann Kovalcik of WildBirds Unlimited, are scheduled for May 7, 10, 11 and 12. Bird Walks are $7 per person.
 
Ford House is also the perfect place for children to explore and discover nature at a special Hunting for Habitat nature adventure on May 21. Young explorers will enjoy a nature scavenger hunt with Dorothy McLeer, a naturalist from the Environmental Interpretive Center in Dearborn, and create their own “bird band” bracelet and bird house, among other fun activities. The Hunting for Habitat kids program is $7 per child and advanced registration is required.
 
With more than 3,000 feet of coastline, Ford House is becoming an important resource for area students studying water. Schools can learn about the importance of a healthy environment by using this outdoor laboratory for water testing. Access for water testing during the spring is free to schools bringing their own testing equipment and will be offered for a small fee for schools who rent Ford House equipment. Availability is restricted and group size will be limited to 30 students.
 

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