The Ford House

Edsel & Eleanor Ford House tells the story of the home life of a prominent American family.

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Ford House Receives National Historic Landmark Designation
Posted: November 3, 2016

We are so thrilled to announce that the Edsel & Eleanor Ford House has received a National Historic Landmark designation. Thank you to the National Historic Landmarks Program for this great honor!
Ford House was honored in recognition of the design work of landscape architect Jens Jensen, in collaboration with the vision of Edsel Ford, architect Albert Kahn and interior designs by Walter Dorwin Teague.
 
U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell and National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis announced the designation of 10 new national historic landmarks on Nov. 2. The designation recognizes the properties as places that possess exceptional value and quality in illustrating or interpreting the heritage of the United States.
 
The National Historic Landmarks Program recognizes historic properties of exceptional value to the nation and promotes the preservation efforts of federal, state and local agencies and Native American tribes, as well as those of private organizations and individuals.
 
The program is one of more than a dozen administered by the National Park Service that provide states and local communities technical assistance, recognition and funding to help preserve our nation's shared history and create close-to-home recreation opportunities.
 
“These 10 new national historic landmarks reveal important pieces of our nation’s diverse heritage through art, architecture and stories of community and identity,” said Secretary Jewell. “Today’s designation ensures future generations can trace, understand and learn from these properties, which join more than 2,500 other landmarks nationwide.”
 
Edsel and Eleanor Ford House, historically known as Gaukler Pointe, was honored as a leading example of the mature work of landscape architect Jensen, a foremost proponent and practitioner of the Prairie Style of landscape design. This country estate was Jensen’s largest private commission and represents a fruitful collaboration between Jensen, Edsel Ford, and architect Albert Kahn. Interior remodeling of the house by renowned industrial designer and Ford collaborator Walter Dorwin Teague in the 1930s further illustrates the Fords’ interest in modern design.
 
“During the National Park Service’s Centennial year, we are celebrating the places that tell America’s stories, and these newly designated National Historic Landmarks recognize important experiences that help us understand our history and culture,” said Director Jarvis. 
 
 

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